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    Apr 12, 2024  
2022-2023 Catalog: September 2022 Edition 
    
2022-2023 Catalog: September 2022 Edition [ARCHIVED]

Course List


Course Information

Below is a list of all courses available at IVC. To search for a particular course, use the Course Filter feature. If you are experiencing difficulty in using the keyword/phrase search, use the “Type” drop-down feature instead of the keyword search.

 

Economics

  
  • ECON 167 COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE: ECONOMICS

    3 Units - 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Limitation: Student must have taken or must be currently taking a course in college-level economics. Application must be approved by CWE coordinator.
    This course provides students an opportunity for supervised work experience. Students extend their classroom-based learning by working at a job related to their major and to their occupational goal. Student, instructor, and employer will cooperatively develop a minimum of three learning objectives. One unit of credit will be awarded for each 75 hours of paid or 60 hours of volunteer employment for successful completion of learning objectives, and for attendance at scheduled seminar sessions. A maximum of four units may be applied toward major requirements or a certificate. NR
  
  • ECON 167 COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE: ECONOMICS

    4 Units - 4 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Limitation: Student must have taken or must be currently taking a course in college-level economics. Application must be approved by CWE coordinator.
    This course provides students an opportunity for supervised work experience. Students extend their classroom-based learning by working at a job related to their major and to their occupational goal. Student, instructor, and employer will cooperatively develop a minimum of three learning objectives. One unit of credit will be awarded for each 75 hours of paid or 60 hours of volunteer employment for successful completion of learning objectives, and for attendance at scheduled seminar sessions. A maximum of four units may be applied toward major requirements or a certificate. NR

Electrical Technology

  
  • ELEC 21 INTRODUCTION TO RENEWABLE ENERGY

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course introduces students to application of renewable energy sources (such as wind, solar, hydro, geothermal, biomass, etc.) to electric power generation. As each renewable energy technology is explained, the student will learn how to perform a basic energy analysis of the corresponding power-generation system. ELEC 21 was formerly offered as ELEC 210. NR
  
  • ELEC 100 BASIC ELECTRICITY

    3 Units - 3 hour lecture
    Transfers: CSU
    This introductory course emphasizes the basic concepts of electricity and their practical applications. The course focuses on basic two-terminal passive devices, direct current and alternating current, plus standard laboratory test equipment and procedures. Students analyze and test, circuits, including batteries, resistors, capacitors and inductors connected in series, parallel, and series-parallel circuits. NR
  
  • ELEC 200 OSHA STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION SAFETY

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    This course covers OSHA policies, procedures, and standards, as well as construction safety and health principles. Topics include scope and applications of the OSHA construction standards. Special emphasis is placed on those areas that are the most hazardous, using OSHA standards as a guide. Upon successful course completion and final examination with 75% or more correct answers the student will receive an OSHA 30-hour Construction Outreach Training Completion Card. NR
  
  • ELEC 200A OSHA 10

    1 Unit - 1 hour lecture
    This course covers OSHA policies, procedures, and standards, as well as construction safety and health principles. Topics include scope and applications of the OSHA construction standards. Special emphasis is placed on those areas that are the most hazardous, using OSHA standards as a guide. Upon successful course completion and final examination with 75% or more correct answers the student will receive an OSHA 10-hour Construction Outreach Training Completion Card. NR
  
  • ELEC 201 RESIDENTIAL WIRING

    4 Units - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    This course provides practical instruction for wiring homes according to National Electrical Code (NEC) rules, covering all code requirements and construction practices for installing electrical systems in one- and two-family dwellings. Through classroom and laboratory instruction, the course covers planning, service equipment, wiring methods, lighting, and the special requirements for kitchens, bathrooms, and other residential living spaces. Outdoor installations are also covered, as well as swimming pools, spas, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment, and remodeling (old work). Safety requirements and procedures are emphasized throughout. NR
  
  • ELEC 202 NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE - RESIDENTIAL

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    This course is an introduction to the National Electrical Code (NEC) requirements for residential wiring. The course covers electrical wiring diagrams, material use, installation methods and calculations of electrical loads used to size feeders and conductors. This course is designed for job seekers in the construction, electrical and air conditioning trades; contractors; inspectors, and lighting specialists. NR
  
  • ELEC 203 COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL WIRING

    4 Units - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    This course provides practical instruction for wiring commercial buildings according to National Electrical Code (NEC) rules, covering all code requirements and construction practices for installing electrical systems in commercial facilities. Through classroom and laboratory instruction, the course covers planning, working drawings, service equipment, wiring methods, branch and feeder circuits, overcurrent protection, motor and appliance circuits, and lighting, as well as heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment. Safety requirements and procedures are emphasized throughout. NR
  
  • ELEC 209 ELECTRICAL SAFETY FUNDAMENTALS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    This course provides the foundations for the bonding and grounding of electrical systems, as a means to ensure safety against electric shock in industrial, commercial, and residential environments. Current technical standards and technologies are used throughout the course. Emphasis is also given to Arc Flash analysis and protection for the electrical workers. NR
  
  • ELEC 211 GRID-TIED SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS

    4 Units - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    This first level lecture/laboratory electrical course will introduce students to the components that make up a photovoltaic (PV) system and the function of each. Students will also learn how to install, troubleshoot, and maintain a residential solar electric system. The student will perform calculations and measure efficiencies of the three major types of PV modules and analyze components and their functions. NR
  
  • ELEC 212 ADVANCED SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAICS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Prerequisite: ELEC 211  
    In this course, students build upon skills learned in ELEC 211 and expand their knowledge on the design of cost-effective photovoltaic (PV) systems with battery backup. Emphasis will be put on stand-alone systems sizing, charge controllers, inverters and commissioning, maintenance and troubleshooting of PV systems. NR
  
  • ELEC 232 BASIC ENERGY MANAGEMENT

    3 Units - 3 hour lecture
    An introductory course on fundamental principles and practices of energy conservation in buildings, including renovation and remodeling. The best practices include the diagnosis, retrofit, maintenance, and energy management of residential buildings, as well as technical and economic operating principles of electrical and mechanical devices for cost-effective decisions and energy-efficient choices NR
  
  • ELEC 234 BLUEPRINT READING

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Covers the basics of Computer-Aided Design and the reading of blueprint plan sets as encountered by the air conditioning and refrigeration field technician, project manager and design engineer. Course includes practical application of numbers to the topics of problem solving, dimension conversion and mathematical verification, proportions and ratios, length measurements with field application and exercises, area calculations, duct and sheet metal calculations, and equivalent units of measurement. NR

Electronic Technology

  
  • ET 92 BASIC ELECTRIC CIRCUITS I

    4 Units - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: MATH 351  
    This introductory course studies the basic concepts of electricity and their practical applications. The course focuses on basic two-terminal passive devices, direct current and transient circuits, plus standard laboratory test equipment and procedures. Analyze, test, design and troubleshoot specific devices and circuits, including batteries, resistors, capacitors and inductors connected in series, parallel, and series-parallel circuits. NR
  
  • ET 99 DIGITAL ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS

    4 Units - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Prerequisite: ET 92  
    Recommended Preparation: ET 105  
    This course introduces the fundamental concepts of digital electronics, including binary numbers, truth tables, logic families, and Boolean algebra. Students test, troubleshoot, analyze, and design digital circuits including gate networks, flip-flops, multivibrators, registers, counters, state machines, memories, digital-to-analog (D/A) and analog-to-digital (A/D) converters, programmable logic devices, tri-state logic, and data communication circuits. NR
  
  • ET 101 ELECTRONICS IN EVERYDAY LIFE

    3 Units - 2.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    This course provides an introduction to the field of electronics. The course studies basic electronic principles, components and terminology and their practical application in such areas as radio, television, digital devices, household and automotive electronics. NR
  
  • ET 104 BASIC ELECTRIC CIRCUITS II

    4 Units - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Prerequisite: ET 92  
    This course covers the principles and applications of AC circuits, including reactance, impedance, resonance, residential wiring and lighting, filters, spectrum analysis, audio, telephone, and radio. Students analyze, test, design and troubleshoot the devices and circuits studied. NR
  
  • ET 105 ELECTRONIC DEVICES AND CIRCUITS I

    4 Units - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Prerequisite: ET 92  
    This course studies basic solid-state devices and their application circuits. Students test devices such as diodes, LEDs, transistors and thyristors and measure their characteristics. The course covers the analysis, troubleshooting, and design of solid-state application circuits, including rectifiers, switching circuits, and amplifiers. NR
  
  • ET 107 ELECTRONIC DEVICES AND CIRCUITS II

    4 Units - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Prerequisite: ET 105  
    This course continues the study of solid-state devices and their application circuits begun in ET 105 . Students test and measure the characteristics of such devices as field effect transistors (FETs), operational amplifiers (op amps), linear integrated circuits, active filters, analog switches, opto-electronics, and fiber optics. They also analyze, design, and troubleshoot application circuits, including amplifiers, power supplies, voltage regulators, and oscillators. NR
  
  • ET 116 INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS

    4 Units - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Recommended Preparation: ET 99  
    This course deals with the application of electronics to industrial monitoring and control. It introduces the basic functional blocks used in industrial systems, including sensors, actuators, controllers, and signal processors. The course covers how to monitor and control industrial processes using a microcontroller or a programmable logic controller (PLC), and how to test, troubleshoot, analyze, and design commonly used industrial circuits and systems. Topics include digital and relay logic, time delay, motors, triacs, robotics, closed-loop control, and remote control. NR
  
  • ET 119 INDUSTRIAL AUTOMATION USING PLCS

    2 Units - 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    This course introduces the PLC, or programmable logic controller, a small, specialized computer used to control and monitor industrial processes. Students gain hands-on experience in both connecting the PLC to external equipment and programming it using ladder diagrams. Topics covered include relay ladder logic, latching, timing, counting, sequential control, sensors, and actuators. NR
  
  • ET 120 INTRODUCTION TO MICROPROCESSORS AND MICROCONTROLLERS

    4 Units - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Recommended Preparation: ET 99  
    This course introduces the microprocessor and microcontroller. Topics include tri-state buses, memory, input/output (I/O) ports, address decoding, assembly and machine language programming, addressing modes, logical and mathematical operations, branching, loops, subroutines, interfacing, interrupts, and troubleshooting techniques. Students design the hardware, software, and interfacing circuitry to provide a microprocessor-or microcontroller-based function, or a complete system. NR
  
  • ET 122A EMBEDDED CONTROL SYSTEMS I

    2 Units - 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Recommended Preparation: ET 99  
    This course covers embedded control systems based on the popular Microchip or Atmel series of controllers. Topics include microcontroller architecture and instruction set, software development tools, timers, subroutines, interrupts, and input/ output interfacing. Students design and construct the hardware, software, and interfacing circuitry to provide a complete embedded control system. NR
  
  • ET 122B EMBEDDED CONTROL SYSTEMS II

    2 Units - 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Prerequisite: ET 122A  
    This course continues the study of embedded controls systems begun in ET 122A  using the popular Microchip or Atmel series of controllers. Students design and construct an individual microcontroller project, including the hardware, software, and interfacing circuity. NR
  
  • ET 168 COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE: ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY

    1 Unit - 1 hour lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Prerequisite: Student must have taken or must be currently taking a course in college-level electronic technology
    Limitation: Application must be approved by CWE coordinator.
    This course provides students an opportunity for supervised work experience. Students extend their classroom-based learning by working at a job related to their major and to their occupational goal. Student, instructor, and employer will cooperatively develop a minimum of three learning objectives. One unit of credit will be awarded for each 75 hours of paid or 60 hours of volunteer employment for successful completion of learning objectives, and for attendance at scheduled seminar sessions. A maximum of four units may be applied toward major requirements for a certificate. NR
  
  • ET 168 COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE: ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY

    2 Units - 2 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Prerequisite: Student must have taken or must be currently taking a course in college-level electronic technology
    Limitation: Application must be approved by CWE coordinator.
    This course provides students an opportunity for supervised work experience. Students extend their classroom-based learning by working at a job related to their major and to their occupational goal. Student, instructor, and employer will cooperatively develop a minimum of three learning objectives. One unit of credit will be awarded for each 75 hours of paid or 60 hours of volunteer employment for successful completion of learning objectives, and for attendance at scheduled seminar sessions. A maximum of four units may be applied toward major requirements for a certificate. NR
  
  • ET 168 COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE: ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY

    3 Units - 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Prerequisite: Student must have taken or must be currently taking a course in college-level electronic technology
    Limitation: Application must be approved by CWE coordinator.
    This course provides students an opportunity for supervised work experience. Students extend their classroom-based learning by working at a job related to their major and to their occupational goal. Student, instructor, and employer will cooperatively develop a minimum of three learning objectives. One unit of credit will be awarded for each 75 hours of paid or 60 hours of volunteer employment for successful completion of learning objectives, and for attendance at scheduled seminar sessions. A maximum of four units may be applied toward major requirements for a certificate. NR

Emeritus Institute - Accounting

  
  • ACCT 405 PERSONAL FINANCE

    0 Units - 3 hours lecture
    This course for older adults covers the management of personal finances using the criteria, methodology and resources for effective financial planning. Topics include money management, insurance analysis, investment and retirement planning, and tax strategies. Students will set personal goals and develop a financial plan to meet those goals. This is a non-credit open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-999

Emeritus Institute - Art

  
  • ART 400 ART HISTORY

    0 Units - 1 hour lecture
    This course provides older adults an overview of the history of Western art. The course focuses on major works of art from the prehistoric to postmodern period. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99
  
  • ART 400C ART HISTORY

    0 Units - 3 hours lecture
    This course provides lifelong education and older adults with an overview of the history of Western art. The course focuses on major works of art from the prehistoric to postmodern period. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. Field trips may be required. R-E-999
  
  • ART 403 ART MEDIA

    0 Units - 3 hours lab
    This noncredit course introduces older adults to various art media, which may include drawing, painting, printmaking, beading, stained glass, or ceramics. It is designed to develop student’s appreciation of art and foster their creative expression. The course also includes the improving of fine motor skills and maintaining cognitive abilities. A list of instructional materials will be provided at the first class session. This is an open-entry/open-exit course.  R-E-999
  
  • ART 405 BEGINNING OIL PAINTING

    0 Units - 0.5 hour lecture, 1 hour lab
    This course is an introduction to the materials and techniques used in oil painting for the older adult. Students will have an opportunity to paint still life, floral, landscape, portrait, and abstract compositions. A list of instructional materials will be provided at the first class session. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99
  
  • ART 408 FLORAL DESIGN-BEGINNING

    0 Units - 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab
    This open-entry/open-exit course for older adults is an introduction to care and handling of fresh flowers, greens and plants in floral design. Detailed instruction and demonstrations of arrangements, corsages, and holiday designs will be given along with individual design time for the execution of take-home projects. R-E-999
  
  • ART 410 INTERMEDIATE PAINTING

    0 Units - 0.5 hour lecture, 1 hour lab
    This intermediate painting course for the older adult emphasizes color theory, composition, and perspective in the application of oil, acrylic, and mixed media. Students will participate in exhibit, framing and installation activities. A list of instructional materials will be provided at the first class session. Students may meet with the instructor at alternate locations. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99
  
  • ART 420 PAINTING IN SUBJECT AREAS

    0 Units - 0.5 hour lecture, 1 hour lab
    This course is an introduction to the theory, history and practice of landscape, seascape, life, and still life painting for the older adult. The materials, applications, and techniques relevant to each subject area will be emphasized. A list of instructional material will be provided at the first class session. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-999
  
  • ART 424 BEGINNING SKETCHING

    0 Units - 0.5 hour lecture, 1 hour lab
    This course presents beginning sketching techniques and media for the older adult. Students will create still lifes, gesture/figure drawings and outdoor sketches in the classic media of pencil, pen and ink, charcoal and pastel. A list of instructional materials will be provided at the first class session. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99
  
  • ART 425 INTERMEDIATE SKETCHING

    0 Units - 0.5 hour lecture, 1 hour lab
    This course presents intermediate sketching techniques and media for older adults. Students will create life drawings, landscapes, and still life compositions in the classic media of pencil, pen and ink, charcoal, and pastel. A list of instructional materials will be provided at the first class session. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99
  
  • ART 426 ADVANCED SKETCHING

    0 Units - 0.5 hour lecture, 1 hour lab
    Recommended Preparation: ART 425  
    This course presents advanced-level sketching techniques and media for older adults. Students will create life drawings, landscapes, and still life compositions in the classic media of pencil, pen and ink, charcoal and pastel, as well as new and mixed media. Abstract and experimental techniques will be emphasized. A list of instructional materials will be provided at the first class session. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99
  
  • ART 430 BEGINNING WATERCOLOR

    0 Units - 0.5 hour lecture, 1 hour lab
    This course for older adults introduces the materials and techniques used in watercolor painting. The course presents the basic methods of applying watercolor in washes, color mixing, and brush techniques, emphasizing the spontaneity of transparent watercolor. A list of instructional materials will be provided at the first class session. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99
  
  • ART 435 INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED WATERCOLOR

    0 Units - 0.5 hour lecture, 1 hour lab
    Recommended Preparation: ART 430  
    This is a course in intermediate and advanced watercolor applications and brush techniques for older adults. Emphasis will be placed on color mixing in a broader palette for washes, glazing, and spontaneous interpretation of the subject matter. A list of instructional materials will be provided at the first class session. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99

Emeritus Institute - Food and Nutrition

  
  • FN 400 NUTRITION/COOKING FOR ONE OR TWO

    0 Units - 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab
    This course offers practical information about nutrition, food preparation, menu planning, and food shopping for one or two people, focusing on the dietary needs of older adults. Simplified meal preparation will be demonstrated in the cooking lab. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99

Emeritus Institute - Health

  
  • HLTH 400 HEALTH AND FITNESS FOR THE MATURE ADULT

    0 Units - 0.5 hour lab
    This course assesses the physical and mental health processes of aging and stresses the importance of exercise in maintaining independence in daily activities. Topics include cognitive and physical exercise, diet, nutrition, and disease and injury prevention as it relates to the older adult. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99

Emeritus Institute - Literature

  
  • ENG 435 FILM GENRES

    0 Units - 1.5 hours lab
    A formal analysis of film as an art form for older adults. Films of various styles and periods will address issues of plot, character, setting, dialogue, imagery and symbolism. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99

Emeritus Institute - Music

  
  • MUS 400 MUSIC APPRECIATION

    0 Units - 1 hour lecture, 0.5 hour lab
    This course is an introduction to music appreciation for older adults. The course provides an overview of important periods and styles of music, the form of compositions, practical music theory, the concert program, and the role and contribution of various instruments and voices in the orchestra. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99
  
  • MUS 450 BEGINNING PIANO

    0 Units - 0.5 hour lecture, 1 hour lab
    This is a beginning course in popular and classical piano technique for older adults. The course focuses on music theory, note reading, scales, fingering, chording, sight reading, and performance techniques. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99
  
  • MUS 451 INTERMEDIATE PIANO

    0 Units - 0.5 hour lecture, 1 hour lab
    This is an intermediate-level course in classical and popular piano technique and performance for older adults. The course focuses on theory, fingering, interpretation techniques, sight reading, and repertoire development. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99
  
  • MUS 452 EARLY ADVANCED PIANO

    0 Units - 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab
    Recommended Preparation: MUS 451 MUS 46 , or two years of piano.
    This course provides group piano instruction at the advanced level for older adults. The course focuses on the historical background and theoretical structure of works from the Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern periods; and on the analysis and criticism of each performance through teacher and group discussion. Preparation for performances includes research and listening in addition to much practice. Students strengthen and refine skills in style, interpretation, and technique, participating in both individual and group assignments. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99
  
  • MUS 454 PIANO MASTER CLASS-SOLO AND COLLABORATIVE PIANO

    0 Units - 3 hours lab
    This course provides advanced piano master classes and performance opportunities for older adults. The emphasis is on the development of individual musicianship and the skills needed to perform within an ensemble. Participation in formal concerts is encouraged. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99
  
  • MUS 460 REHEARSAL AND PERFORMANCE: INSTRUMENTAL

    0 Units - 1 hour lecture, 1 hour lab
    Recommended Preparation: Previous instrumental training and demonstrated proficiency
    This course for older adults focuses on the study, preparation, and performance of an orchestral concert repertoire. Students may participate in concerts and recitals at alternate locations. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99
  
  • MUS 461 MAKE MUSIC FOR LIFE

    0 Units - 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab
    This open-entry/open-exit course, for older adults, focuses on improving technical skills,musical interpretation, and the joy of playing music in a group setting. Emphasis includes deep breathing, poised relaxation, and a scientific approach to tone production. The class is open to woodwind, brass, string and percussion instrumentalists. R-E-99
  
  • MUS 480 CHORAL ENSEMBLE

    0 Units - 0.75 hours lecture, 0.75 hours lab
    This is a course in choral singing and choral literature for older adults. The course focuses on developing correct singing techniques, vocal production, and sight-reading skills. Students may participate in concerts and recitals at alternate locations. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99

Emeritus Institute - Theatre Arts

  
  • TA 415 THEATRE REHEARSAL AND PERFORMANCE

    0 Units - 1.5 hours lab
    This course for older adults focuses on the preparation, rehearsal, and performance of public theatre productions. Students participate in selecting a production, analyzing the script, auditioning, acting, technical preparation, and production management. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99
  
  • TA 416 VOICE AND DICTION FOR THE MATURE ADULT

    0 Units - 3 hours lecture
    In this course adult students study and assess the physical and mental health processes of an aging voice through the study of principles and practices of vocal and articulatory development and control for the adult. The course provides drills in phonation and drills for clarity, ease in articulation, resonance, vocal variety and injury prevention as it relates to the older adult. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99
  
  • TA 445 THEATRICAL SCENE PAINTING AND FAUX FINISHING FOR THE HOME

    0 Units - 3 hours lab
    In this course adult students learn skills in faux finishing techniques and mural painting. Students will create sample boards of techniques demonstrated by the instructor. Students will learn how to simulate wood, marble, stone, brick and fabric using a variety of paint techniques. Skills learned in this class are applicable to both theatrical and interior design practice. This is an open-entry/open-exit course. R-E-99

Engineering

  
  • ENGR 7 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING METHODS

    4 Units - 3 hours lecture, 4 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: DMP 220  
    This course provides practical experience for students majoring in engineering and applied sciences. It focuses on modeling and designing with a physical element such as a robot or quad-copter. Students will develop skills such as analyzing physical structures, manufacturing small components, testing, team building, planning, scheduling, management, and implementation of a final design. Projects may include data collection, design reviews, analysis, report writing, group construction projects, and participation in competitions based on related criteria. NR
  
  • ENGR 11 INTRO TO ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING

    1 Unit - 1 hour lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course provides an overview of occupations in electrical and computer science engineering and related technologies. It is designed to familiarize students with the educational requirements for and opportunities for employment as an engineer or engineering technologist, as well as the nature and responsibilities of such work. NR
  
  • ENGR 20 INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING AND PROBLEM SOLVING WITH MATLAB

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Prerequisite: MATH 2  
    Recommended Preparation: CS 1  
    This course provides an introduction to computer programming within the numerical computing environment of MATLAB/Simulink. It provides students with a working knowledge of computer-based problem-solving methods relevant to science and engineering. It introduces the fundamentals of procedural and object-oriented programming with MATLAB/Simulink program to formulate, solve, and verify solutions to engineering, math and physics problems. NR
  
  • ENGR 21 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY

    1 Unit - 1 hour lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course provides an overview of occupations in engineering and related technologies. It is designed to familiarize students with the educational requirements for and opportunities for employment as an engineer or engineering technologist, as well as the nature and responsibilities of such work. NR
  
  • ENGR 23 ENGINEERING GRAPHICS AND DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY

    3 Units - 2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course introduces the principles of graphic modeling and problem solving with the support of 3D computer-aided design. Students solve common math and engineering problems with the assistance of 3D CAD models. Typical assignments involve generating standard orthographic views, building 2D and 3D civil engineering models, finding intersections and angles created by multiple lines and surfaces, constructing developments, and performing vector computations. NR
  
  • ENGR 25 3D CIVIL COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN

    3 Units - 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: ENGR 23   is strongly recommended
    This is an advanced computer aided design course which demonstrates modern three dimensional terrain modeling techniques as well as digital civil design concepts. In addition to learning how to collect, refine, and model topographical data points in modern parametric CAD systems, students will generate detailed drawing sets, cost and feasibility studies of detailed projects, and industry standard presentations. Recent advances in base mapping, GPS, GIS, earthwork management, and watershed analysis are central to laboratory assignments. Students require solid knowledge of two and three dimensional CAD modeling and civil engineering standards related to site planning, codes, and topography.  NR
  
  • ENGR 30 STATICS OF RIGID BODIES AND STRUCTURES

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Prerequisite: PHYS 4A   and MATH 3B   or MATH 3BH  
    Recommended Preparation: MATH 4A , MATH 26  
    This course covers major topics in statics such as addition and resolution of forces, and developing equivalent systems of forces. It includes analysis and calculations related to concentrated and distributed forces, centroids, and rigid-body equilibrium analysis under forces. The course also includes calculations related to one-dimensional cables and bars under axial loads. It covers topics of statical determinacy, stress, strain, and elastic behavior, and numerical analysis of statically determinate and indeterminate trusses. NR
  
  • ENGR 54 PRINCIPLES OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Prerequisite: CHEM 1A , PHYS 4A  
    This course covers major topics related to engineering design, manufacturing, and the properties of materials used in modern component construction. Students will learn to implement design methods required to efficiently use manufacturing methods such as machining, forming, and molding. students will conduct analysis of material used for practical application of manufacturing processes. Atomic structure, bonding, defects, phase equilibria, mechanical properties, electrical properties, and optical properties are key elements which students study in detail to provide a firm support for student assumptions during analysis. NR
  
  • ENGR 70 INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK ANALYSIS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Prerequisite: MATH 3B  or MATH 3BH PHYS 4B  , and MATH 24   or MATH 24H  
    This course provides instruction in the modeling and analysis of electrical networks. Introduction to basic network theorems, sinusoidal steady state, transient analysis of RLC (Resistor, Inductor, Capacitor) networks, impedance concept, and solving network circuit problems. NR
  
  • ENGR 70L NETWORK ANALYSIS LABORATORY I

    1 Unit - 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU, UC credit pending
    Prerequisite: MATH 3B  or MATH 3BH  and PHYS 4B  
    Recommended Preparation: Corequisite not required for ENGRMAE60 articulation. Corequisite is required for EECS students satisfying UC standard of simultaneous enrollment in ENGR70A and ENGR70LA
    This course provides the foundations for the construction and measurement of electrical circuits. The laboratory experiments will include basic use of electrical testers, such as multimeters, oscilloscopes, as well as power supplies, and function generators. In the labs, the students will lay out circuits and predict their behavior mathematically by using circuit simulation software. Student will interpret measured and simulated data based on principles of circuit analysis for DC, and transient conditions. The elementary circuit design will also include practical considerations such as component value tolerance and non-ideal aspects of laboratory instruments. Construction and measurements of basic operational amplifier circuits shall also be part of the laboratory activities. NR
  
  • ENGR 80 ENGINEERING DYNAMICS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Prerequisite: PHYS 4A  
    Recommended Preparation: MATH 4A  
    This course is an introduction to the kinetics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. The topics covered include the Newton-Euler principles, work and energy relationships, and impulse and momentum methods to ascertain the dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. NR
  
  • ENGR 83 COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN TECHNIQUES

    3 Units - 2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: DR 50  
    This intermediate-level course presents the latest techniques in parametric 3D computer-aided design and analysis. Students integrate design criteria such as materials of construction, manufacturing processes, cost constraints, aesthetics, and failure assessment to generate and refine industry-standard mechanical components. NR
  
  • ENGR 91 INTRODUCTION TO THERMODYNAMICS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Prerequisite: PHYS 4C  
    This course covers major topics related to thermodynamic systems. Students will learn to identify the control mass and control volume in thermodynamic problems, calculate properties of pure substances, map and analyze processes on Temperature-Volume, Pressure-Volume, and Temperature-Entropy diagrams, apply the first and second laws of thermodynamics to control mass and control volume processes, and use the Carnot thermodynamic cycle to calculate the limits of the thermal efficiency. NR
  
  • ENGR 100 RESEARCH TOPICS IN ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCES

    2 Units - 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    This course provides practical experience for students majoring in engineering and applied sciences. It focuses on management of all types of engineering projects from visualization, planning, scheduling, management, and implementation. Projects may include data collection, analysis, report writing, and construction management. R-I-3
  
  • ENGR 168A COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE: ENGINEERING

    1 Unit - 1 hour lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Limitation: Application must be approved by CWE coordinator.
    This course provides students an opportunity for supervised work experience. Students extend their classroom-based occupational learning by working at a job related to their major and to their occupational goal. Student, instructor, and employer will cooperatively develop a minimum of three learning objectives. One unit of credit will be awarded for each 75 hours of paid or 60 hours of volunteer employment for successful completion of learning objectives, and for attendance at scheduled seminar sessions. A maximum of four units may be applied toward major requirements for a certificate. R-I-4
  
  • ENGR 168B COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE: ENGINEERING

    2 Units - 2 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Limitation: Application must be approved by CWE coordinator.
    This course provides students an opportunity for supervised work experience. Students extend their classroom-based occupational learning by working at a job related to their major and to their occupational goal. Student, instructor, and employer will cooperatively develop a minimum of three learning objectives. One unit of credit will be awarded for each 75 hours of paid or 60 hours of volunteer employment for successful completion of learning objectives, and for attendance at scheduled seminar sessions. A maximum of four units may be applied toward major requirements for a certificate. R-I-4
  
  • ENGR 168C COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE: ENGINEERING

    3 Units - 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Limitation: Application must be approved by CWE coordinator.
    This course provides students an opportunity for supervised work experience. Students extend their classroom-based occupational learning by working at a job related to their major and to their occupational goal. Student, instructor, and employer will cooperatively develop a minimum of three learning objectives. One unit of credit will be awarded for each 75 hours of paid or 60 hours of volunteer employment for successful completion of learning objectives, and for attendance at scheduled seminar sessions. A maximum of four units may be applied toward major requirements for a certificate. R-I-4
  
  • ENGR 168D COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE: ENGINEERING

    4 Units - 4 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Limitation: Application must be approved by CWE coordinator.
    This course provides students an opportunity for supervised work experience. Students extend their classroom-based occupational learning by working at a job related to their major and to their occupational goal. Student, instructor, and employer will cooperatively develop a minimum of three learning objectives. One unit of credit will be awarded for each 75 hours of paid or 60 hours of volunteer employment for successful completion of learning objectives, and for attendance at scheduled seminar sessions. A maximum of four units may be applied toward major requirements for a certificate. R-I-4

English as a Second Language

  
  • ESL 80 ACADEMIC WRITING III FOR MULTILINGUAL WRITERS

    5 Units - 5 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Prerequisite: ESL 370  
    Corequisite: ESL 380L  
    This is the third semester of the credit ESL academic writing sequence for multilingual writers who need to gain a greater understanding of Academic English. Students write essays in response to culturally diverse readings from a range of college-level texts. The course covers how to develop a thesis statement, how to control the structure of an academic essay, and how to develop details of support through multiple drafts. It focuses on refining academic reading, writing, language, and critical thinking skills with an emphasis on the academic essay. Successful completion allows students to enroll in ESL 90. ESL 80 is CSU and UC transferable. NR
  
  • ESL 90 ACADEMIC WRITING IV FOR MULTILINGUAL WRITERS

    5 Units - 5 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Prerequisite: ESL 80  
    Corequisite: ESL 390L  
     

    This is the fourth and final semester of the ESL academic writing sequence for multi-lingual writers who need to gain proficiency in Academic English. Students write essays in response to culturally diverse readings from a range of college-level texts. The course covers how to state and develop a central idea of an essay, organize paragraphs into logical sequence, and integrate the ideas of others into a paper that expresses the writer’s own analysis as developed through multiple drafts. The course also introduces students to critical reading and writing to promote the study of language conventions used to construct academic writing. Successful completion allows students to enroll in WR 1. ESL 90 is CSU and UC transferable. NR

  
  • ESL 302 ACADEMIC LANGUAGE SUPPORT FOR COLLEGE WRITING

    2 Units - 2 hours lecture
    Corequisite: WR 1   and WR 382  
    ESL 302 is a supplemental writing course taught in conjunction with WR 1. ESL 302 is designed for non-native English writers who need to refine their proficiency in Academic English as they are concurrently enrolled in WR 1. In ESL 302, students will receive additional linguistic support as they write essays in response to assigned texts from a range of college-level readings. Students eligible for this course need to have a WR1 plus ESL 302 placement or WR 1 plus ESL 302 language proficiency as determined by ESL faculty.Successful completion of ESL 302 and WR 1 allows students to enroll in WR 2. NR
  
  • ESL 360 ACADEMIC WRITING I FOR MULTILINGUAL WRITERS

    5 units - 5 hours lecture
    Prerequisite: AESL 504  or by ESL assessment
    Limitation: This is a writing course in which the instructor will give individualized feedback on writing assignments. For this reason, the course cap should be 25 students.
    The first course of the ESL academic writing sequence for multilingual writers who need to gain an understanding of Academic English. Focuses on the structure and development of the academic paragraph and the correct use of appropriate grammatical structures. Students are required to complete rigorous reading and writing tasks that introduce students to college-level academic requirements. NR
  
  • ESL 370 ACADEMIC WRITING II FOR MULTILINGUAL WRITERS

    5 Units - 5 hours lecture
    Prerequisite: ESL 360  
    This the second course of the credit ESL academic writing sequence for multilingual writers who need to gain an understanding of Academic English. Students will write paragraphs and essays as they respond to text based prompts. The course covers refining the academic paragraph and structuring the academic essay. The course focuses on developing academic reading, writing, language, and critical thinking skills. Successful completion allows students to enroll in ESL 80. NR
  
  • ESL 370L ACADEMIC WRITING II LEARNING CENTER

    0.5 units - 1.5 hours learning center
    Corequisite: ESL 370  
    This pass/no-pass course offers supplemental language learning assistance for students concurrently enrolled in ESL 370. Students must complete 24 hours in the learning center during the semester and successfully complete ESL 370 in order to receive credit. R-E-3
  
  • ESL 380L ACADEMIC WRITING III LEARNING CENTER

    0.5 Unit - 1.5 hours learning center 1.5 hours learning center
    Corequisite: ESL 80  
    This pass/no-pass course offers supplemental language learning assistance for students concurrently enrolled in ESL 80. Students must complete 24 hours in the learning center during the semester and successfully complete ESL 80 in order to receive credit.Formally offered as ESL 301L R-E-3
  
  • ESL 382 WRITING CONFERENCE FOR ESL 302

    0.5 units - 1.5 hours learning center
    Corequisite: ESL 302  
    This pass/no-pass corequisite course offers one-on-one conference instruction with English and ESL instructors for students enrolled in ESL 302. Students must spend at least 24 hours in the Writing Center during the semester and participate in no fewer than four formal conferences in order to receive credit. R-E-3
  
  • ESL 384 ADVANCED VOCABULARY SKILLS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Recommended Preparation: AESL 505  or ESL 370  (or higher) completion or concurrent enrollment
    This course is designed to help English language learners develop college-level vocabulary. Students gain understanding of key academic words and collocations and how to use them appropriately in both oral and written contexts. Fall semester only. NR
  
  • ESL 385 ACADEMIC READING

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Recommended Preparation: ESL assessment
    The course introduces non-native English students to reading strategies that students may apply to textbooks and other academic prose. Students focus on building background information in content areas in a variety of disciplines. Fall semester only. NR
  
  • ESL 388 ADVANCED GRAMMAR

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Recommended Preparation: AESL 505  or ESL 370  (or above) completion on concurrent enrollment.
    This course is designed to help advanced English language learners improve their grammar, especially for academic writing and other formal settings. Fall semester only. NR
  
  • ESL 389 ENGLISH LANGUAGE CENTER (ELC)

    0 Units - 12 hours learning center
    Corequisite: ESL 302 , ESL 352 , ESL 360 , ESL 362 , ESL 364 ESL 370 ESL 372 ESL 374 ESL 384 ,  ESL 385 ESL 388 , ESL 392 ESL 394 ESL 395 ESL 398  
    This open-entry/open-exit course offers conference instruction with ESL language instructors for students enrolled in specified ESL corequisite courses. The course focus is on exercises and assignments to improve students’ speaking, listening, reading, writing, and grammar skills in English. R-E-99
  
  • ESL 390L ACADEMIC WRITING IV LEARNING CENTER

    0.5 Unit - 1.5 hours learning center 1.5 hours learning center
    Corequisite: ESL 90  
    This pass/no-pass course offers supplemental language learning assistance for students enrolled in ESL 90. Formerly offered as ESL 201L. Students must complete 24 hours in the learning center during the semester and successfully complete ESL 90 in order to receive credit. R-E-3
  
  • ESL 394 ADVANCED VOCABULARY SKILLS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    This course is designed to enhance college-level vocabulary. Topics include academic word lists; discipline specific terminology and expressions; and general academic language. Spring semester only. NR
  
  • ESL 395 ACADEMIC READING

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    This course will introduce students to strategies employed in academic reading with a focus on language development. Spring semester only. NR
  
  • ESL 398 ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND WRITING

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Recommended Preparation: ESL 361B
    This course focuses on complex grammatical structures particularly difficult for non-native writers of English. Spring semester only. NR

English: Special Services

  
  • ESS 310 BASIC GRAMMAR AND PARAGRAPHING SKILLS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Limitation: Placement in this course is based on learning disability assessment, eligibility, and an individual education plan.
    Although this course is open to anyone, it is designed for students with learning disabilities who need assistance developing single paragraphs. Students practice writing paragraphs utilizing topic sentences, organizational patterns, supporting details, and transitions in order to achieve paragraph unity, coherence, cohesion, and development. Focus is on writing as a process, and on writing grammatically correct and structurally varied sentences. NR
  
  • ESS 315 LEARNING DEVELOPMENT PRACTICUM

    0.5 Unit - 2 hours lab
    Corequisite: ESS 310 , ESS 340 , ESS 345  or MSS 325  
    Limitation: Placement in this course is based on learning disability assessment, eligibility, and an individual education plan.
    This course is intended for students with learning disabilities who need help achieving proficiency in basic reading, writing, spelling and/or math skills. These skills are enhanced by enrolling in one or more of the corequisite courses. This course is offered on a pass/no-pass basis only. NR
  
  • ESS 340 WORD ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    2 Units - 2 hours lecture
    Limitation: Placement in this course is based on learning disability assessment, eligibility, and an individual education plan.
    Although this course is open to anyone, it is designed for students with learning disabilities who need prescriptive instruction in phonics, syllabication, spelling rules, word parts, and memory aids for words that do not lend themselves to usual spelling patterns. This course presents the basic rules of spelling using a variety of learning strategies and modalities. NR
  
  • ESS 345 BASIC READING AND VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Limitation: Placement is this course is based on learning disability assessment, eligibility, and an individual education plan.
    Although this course is open to anyone, it is intended for students with learning disabilities. The course presents strategies for improving reading comprehension, vocabulary and study skills. Students use software applications designed to strengthen reading ability and vocabulary development. NR

Entrepreneurship

  
  • ENTR 117 SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU
    This course introduces social media tools used for marketing in business. Topics include uses, ethics, and guidelines for social networking, and online marketing channels. Students create a social media marketing campaign through the use of Web applications, such as Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter. ENTR 117 is also listed as CIM 117; credit will be given in either area, not both NR
  
  • ENTR 160 ENTREPRENEURSHIP: MANAGING YOUR BUSINESS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU
    This course introduces key elements of entrepreneurship and small business development. It focuses on the phases and process of building a viable business plan and putting the plan to work. Topics of exploration include building a marketing plan and financial plan, conducting feasibility studies, the nature of competition and markets, and the global aspects of entrepreneurship. The course provides students with a foundation for understanding the role of small business within society. It also provides preparation for individuals seeking to engage in entrepreneurial ventures. NR
  
  • ENTR 200 PATHWAYS TO SUCCESS

    1 Unit - 1 hour lecture
    This interactive course enables students to engage in the fundamental aspects of creatively developing frameworks of passion and purpose as a means of personal empowerment and wealth. The course promotes entrepreneurial thinking across disciplines and assists students in developing a process for transforming ideas into sustainable success. Students will examine how others overcame adversity and achieved success. The course includes individualized learning assessments designed to assist the student in exploring their frameworks of thought and entrepreneurial potential. NR
  
  • ENTR 201 CREATIVITY AND IDEA GENERATION

    1 Unit - 1 hour lecture
    This course helps students discover that creativity is a process that can be learned. The relationship between imagination, creativity, and innovation will be examined and students will explore the use of creativity tools and processes to develop solutions for business problems. During the course, students will learn how to use questions to spark creativity. NR
  
  • ENTR 202 INNOVATIONS AND OPPORTUNITIES

    2 Units - 2 hours lecture
    This cross-disciplinary course helps students develop mental frameworks that enable them to link invention and insight as means to create social and economic value. Students will explore the creative process, the link between strategy and innovation, the development of an innovation infrastructure, and ways to measure the innovation process. This course prepares students to contribute in unique and productive ways to today’s entrepreneurial and organizational demands. NR
  
  • ENTR 211 BUSINESS MODELS: THE DESIGN AND DELIVERY OF VALUE

    2 Units - 2 hours lecture
    Successful entrepreneurs are able to describe how their organization creates, delivers, and captures value. This cross-disciplinary course helps students understand business model generation by examining customer segments, profitability and the process of identifying business goals, developing strategic objectives, critical success factors, and key performance indicators for entrepreneurial endeavors. Students will learn how to filter business opportunities, project whether business opportunities can be scalable, identify and validate potential markets, and estimate profitability. NR
  
  • ENTR 212 MARKET VALIDATION AND RESEARCH

    1 Unit - 1 hour lecture
    This course explores a variety of resources, tools, and techniques for collecting and analyzing market research data. It engages students in the process of assessing target markets, implementing a market validation strategy, and interpreting primary and secondary research to create effective plans and forecasts. The course illustrates how targeting the market can reduce marketing costs and increase effectiveness. It also discusses common marketing mistakes and the limits of market research. NR
 

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