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    Irvine Valley College
   
 
  Oct 19, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018 Catalog: August 2017 Edition

Course Numbers


1-299
Courses intended for associate degrees, occupational certificates, and transfer purposes (see further explanations below).

1-99
Courses that generally transfer to both CSU and UC.
UC credit provisos, if any, are explained on the 2017-18 UC Course List . Many general education courses are numbered in this range.

100-199
Courses that generally transfer to CSU but not to UC.
Many general education courses are numbered in this range.

200-299
Courses that may occasionally carry transfer credit to four-year institutions; it is up to the receiving institution to make that determination.
Courses in this range include those intended for skill development and for continuing education (whether related to employment or personal development).

Please note: Students may count only one English course below transfer-level freshman composition as credit toward the associate degree. Writing 1 is the first transfer-level composition course at Irvine Valley College; Writing 201 is the only 200-level English course that may be applied for associate degree credit.

300-399
Basic skills courses.
Courses in this range are not applicable to associate degrees or certificates, nor do they carry transfer credit to four-year institutions. These courses do not count toward the 60-unit requirement for graduation and are not used in calculating students’ grade point averages for associate degrees or certificates. There is also a state-imposed restriction limiting students to taking no more than 30 units of basic skills classes.

400-499
Courses that are typically designed for older adults.
These courses do not apply toward degrees or certificates and do not carry transfer credit to four-year institutions.

500-599
Non-credit courses.

EXP 289
Courses that are being considered for, but are not yet officially part of, the regular college curriculum.
For this reason, these courses are considered “experimental” and are not published in the college catalog. EXP 289 courses may carry transfer credit to four-year institutions; it is up to the receiving institution to make that determination.

EXP 389
Experimental courses below transfer level.
Experimental courses are not published in the college catalog.

C-ID Numbers

Some courses in the IVC catalog include a “C-ID” number at the end of the course description. The Course Identification Numbering System (C-ID) number identifies a lower-division, transferable course commonly articulated between the California Community Colleges and four-year universities, including Universities of California, the California State Universities, as well as with many of California’s independent colleges and universities. This statewide numbering system is independent from the course numbers assigned by local California community colleges.  

A C-ID number next to a course signals that participating California colleges and universities have determined that courses offered by other California community colleges are comparable in content and scope to courses offered on their own campuses, regardless of their unique titles or local course number.  Thus, if a schedule of classes or catalog lists a course bearing a C-ID number, for example COMM 110, students at that college can be assured that it will be accepted in lieu of a course bearing the C-ID COMM 110 designation at another community college.  In other words, the C-ID designation can be used to identify comparable courses at different community colleges. However, students should always go to www.assist.org to confirm how each college’s course will be accepted at a particular four-year college or university for transfer credit.

The C-ID numbering system is useful for students attending more than one community college and is applied to many of the transferable courses students need as preparation for transfer.  Because these course requirements may change and because courses may be modified and qualified for or deleted from the C-ID database, students should always check with a counselor to determine how C-ID designated courses fit into their educational plans for transfer.