Jan 23, 2021  
2020-2021 Catalog Addendum 
    
2020-2021 Catalog Addendum

Course List


Course Information

Below is a list of all courses available at IVC. To search for a particular course, use the Course Filter feature. If you are experiencing difficulty in using the keyword/phrase search, use the “Type” drop-down feature instead of the keyword search.

 

English as a Second Language

  
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    ESL 380L ACADEMIC WRITING III LEARNING CENTER

    0.5 Unit - 1.5 hours learning center 1.5 hours learning center
    Corequisite: ESL 80  
    This pass/no-pass course offers supplemental language learning assistance for students concurrently enrolled in ESL 80. Students must complete 24 hours in the learning center during the semester and successfully complete ESL 80 in order to receive credit.Formally offered as ESL 301L R-E-3
  
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    ESL 382 WRITING CONFERENCE FOR ESL 302

    0.5 units - 1.5 hours learning center
    Corequisite: ESL 302  
    This pass/no-pass corequisite course offers one-on-one conference instruction with English and ESL instructors for students enrolled in ESL 302. Students must spend at least 24 hours in the Writing Center during the semester and participate in no fewer than four formal conferences in order to receive credit. R-E-3
  
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    ESL 383 ADVANCED PRONUNCIATION

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Recommended Preparation: ESL assessment
    This course is designed to help advanced ESL students improve their listening and self-monitoring skills in daily speech and build their pronunciation awareness. The course provides extensive practice with all aspects of pronunciation. Fall semester only. NR
  
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    ESL 384 ADVANCED VOCABULARY SKILLS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Recommended Preparation: ESL assessment
    This course is designed to develop college-level vocabulary. Topics include etymology, academic terminology, idiomatic expressions, and language appropriate to social, cultural and current events. Fall semester only. NR
  
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    ESL 385 ACADEMIC READING

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Recommended Preparation: ESL assessment
    The course introduces non-native English students to reading strategies that students may apply to textbooks and other academic prose. Students focus on building background information in content areas in a variety of disciplines. Fall semester only. NR
  
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    ESL 388 ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND WRITING

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Recommended Preparation: ESL 361B  
    This course focuses on grammatical structures particularly difficult for advanced non-native speakers of English, and on writing grammatically correct academic prose. Fall semester only. NR
  
  
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    ESL 390 LANGUAGE THROUGH LITERATURE

    4 Units - 4 hours lecture
    Recommended Preparation: ESL assessment
    This course focuses on developing literary and cultural understanding of fiction, drama, and poetry, and on increasing knowledge of the English language in all areas: reading, writing, vocabulary, and oral/aural skills. Fall semester only. NR
  
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    ESL 390L ACADEMIC WRITING IV LEARNING CENTER

    0.5 Unit - 1.5 hours learning center 1.5 hours learning center
    Corequisite: ESL 90  
    This pass/no-pass course offers supplemental language learning assistance for students enrolled in ESL 90. Formerly offered as ESL 201L. Students must complete 24 hours in the learning center during the semester and successfully complete ESL 90 in order to receive credit. R-E-3
  
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    ESL 394 ADVANCED VOCABULARY SKILLS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    This course is designed to enhance college-level vocabulary. Topics include academic word lists; discipline specific terminology and expressions; and general academic language. Spring semester only. NR
  
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    ESL 395 ACADEMIC READING

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    This course will introduce students to strategies employed in academic reading with a focus on language development. Spring semester only. NR
  
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    ESL 397 ADVANCED GRAMMAR REVIEW

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    It is designed for students who have completed the intermediate sequence of the English as a Second Language program or the equivalent, or who are entering college-level courses. The course focuses on a review of grammatical structures, particularly verb tenses, verb moods, and word forms. Spring semester only. NR
  
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    ESL 398 ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND WRITING

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Recommended Preparation: ESL 361B
    This course focuses on complex grammatical structures particularly difficult for non-native writers of English. Spring semester only. NR
  
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    ESL 399 LANGUAGE THROUGH LITERATURE

    4 Units - 4 hours lecture
    This course focuses on increasing the English proficiency of reading, writing, vocabulary, and oral skills as advanced ESL students read and analyze works of fiction, drama, and poetry. Emphasis is on active student participation in a wide variety of both oral and written activities. Spring semester only. NR

English: Special Services

  
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    ESS 310 BASIC GRAMMAR AND PARAGRAPHING SKILLS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Limitation: Placement in this course is based on learning disability assessment, eligibility, and an individual education plan.
    Although this course is open to anyone, it is designed for students with learning disabilities who need assistance developing single paragraphs. Students practice writing paragraphs utilizing topic sentences, organizational patterns, supporting details, and transitions in order to achieve paragraph unity, coherence, cohesion, and development. Focus is on writing as a process, and on writing grammatically correct and structurally varied sentences. NR
  
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    ESS 315 LEARNING DEVELOPMENT PRACTICUM

    0.5 Unit - 2 hours lab
    Corequisite: ESS 310 , ESS 340 , ESS 345  or MSS 325 
    Limitation: Placement in this course is based on learning disability assessment, eligibility, and an individual education plan.
    This course is intended for students with learning disabilities who need help achieving proficiency in basic reading, writing, spelling and/or math skills. These skills are enhanced by enrolling in one or more of the corequisite courses. This course is offered on a pass/no-pass basis only. NR
  
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    ESS 340 WORD ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    2 Units - 2 hours lecture
    Limitation: Placement in this course is based on learning disability assessment, eligibility, and an individual education plan.
    Although this course is open to anyone, it is designed for students with learning disabilities who need prescriptive instruction in phonics, syllabication, spelling rules, word parts, and memory aids for words that do not lend themselves to usual spelling patterns. This course presents the basic rules of spelling using a variety of learning strategies and modalities. NR
  
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    ESS 345 BASIC READING AND VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Limitation: Placement is this course is based on learning disability assessment, eligibility, and an individual education plan.
    Although this course is open to anyone, it is intended for students with learning disabilities. The course presents strategies for improving reading comprehension, vocabulary and study skills. Students use software applications designed to strengthen reading ability and vocabulary development. NR

Entrepreneurship

  
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    ENTR 117 SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU
    This course introduces social media tools used for marketing in business. Topics include uses, ethics, and guidelines for social networking, and online marketing channels. Students create a social media marketing campaign through the use of Web applications, such as Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter. ENTR 117 is also listed as CIM 117; credit will be given in either area, not both NR
  
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    ENTR 160 ENTREPRENEURSHIP: MANAGING YOUR BUSINESS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU
    This course introduces key elements of entrepreneurship and small business development. It focuses on the phases and process of building a viable business plan and putting the plan to work. Topics of exploration include building a marketing plan and financial plan, conducting feasibility studies, the nature of competition and markets, and the global aspects of entrepreneurship. The course provides students with a foundation for understanding the role of small business within society. It also provides preparation for individuals seeking to engage in entrepreneurial ventures. NR
  
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    ENTR 200 PATHWAYS TO SUCCESS

    1 Unit - 1 hour lecture
    This interactive course enables students to engage in the fundamental aspects of creatively developing frameworks of passion and purpose as a means of personal empowerment and wealth. The course promotes entrepreneurial thinking across disciplines and assists students in developing a process for transforming ideas into sustainable success. Students will examine how others overcame adversity and achieved success. The course includes individualized learning assessments designed to assist the student in exploring their frameworks of thought and entrepreneurial potential. NR
  
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    ENTR 201 CREATIVITY AND IDEA GENERATION

    1 Unit - 1 hour lecture
    This course helps students discover that creativity is a process that can be learned. The relationship between imagination, creativity, and innovation will be examined and students will explore the use of creativity tools and processes to develop solutions for business problems. During the course, students will learn how to use questions to spark creativity. NR
  
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    ENTR 202 INNOVATIONS AND OPPORTUNITIES

    2 Units - 2 hours lecture
    This cross-disciplinary course helps students develop mental frameworks that enable them to link invention and insight as means to create social and economic value. Students will explore the creative process, the link between strategy and innovation, the development of an innovation infrastructure, and ways to measure the innovation process. This course prepares students to contribute in unique and productive ways to today’s entrepreneurial and organizational demands. NR
  
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    ENTR 211 BUSINESS MODELS: THE DESIGN AND DELIVERY OF VALUE

    2 Units - 2 hours lecture
    Successful entrepreneurs are able to describe how their organization creates, delivers, and captures value. This cross-disciplinary course helps students understand business model generation by examining customer segments, profitability and the process of identifying business goals, developing strategic objectives, critical success factors, and key performance indicators for entrepreneurial endeavors. Students will learn how to filter business opportunities, project whether business opportunities can be scalable, identify and validate potential markets, and estimate profitability. NR
  
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    ENTR 212 MARKET VALIDATION AND RESEARCH

    1 Unit - 1 hour lecture
    This course explores a variety of resources, tools, and techniques for collecting and analyzing market research data. It engages students in the process of assessing target markets, implementing a market validation strategy, and interpreting primary and secondary research to create effective plans and forecasts. The course illustrates how targeting the market can reduce marketing costs and increase effectiveness. It also discusses common marketing mistakes and the limits of market research. NR
  
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    ENTR 220 BUSINESS START-UP DESIGN-LEGAL, OPERATIONS AND PEOPLE

    2 Units - 2 hours lecture
    This course examines legal and operational elements of business start-up and structure. The course will help entrepreneurs recognize legal, start-up, human resource, and operational issues before they become problems. The course does not replace the need for competent legal advice but endeavors to help entrepreneurs seek and select legal resources in an informed and economical manner. NR
  
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    ENTR 221 MONEY, ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE FOR ENTREPRENEURS

    2 Units - 2 hours lecture
    This course examines tools and practices necessary for entrepreneurs to access financing, manage cash flow, and measure financial performance. The course will help entrepreneurs to meet financial record-keeping requirements, identify areas of improvement, and determine actions needed to improve performance. Topics include entrepreneurial finance, assessing venture value, financial scorecard, financial dashboard, record-keeping, and cash management. NR
  
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    ENTR 222 BUSINESS STRUCTURE AND LEGAL REQUIREMENTS

    1 Unit - 1 hour lecture
    This course examines the primary forms of business structure, i.e. sole proprietorship, partnership, and corporation, and legal elements needed to comply with regulations and guidelines of various governmental agencies. The course will help entrepreneurs recognize legal issues before they become legal problems, and manage and grow businesses more effectively within the law. The course does not replace the need for competent legal advice but endeavors to help entrepreneurs seek and select legal resources in an informed and economical manner. NR
  
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    ENTR 223 BUILDING THE ENTREPRENEURIAL TEAM

    2 Units - 2 hours lecture
    This course is designed to help build successful teams and personal partnerships with coaches, mentors and advisors who can help them to make the most of their own potential and to develop their business ideas. Students will consider how managing human resources can create a competitive advantage. NR
  
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    ENTR 224 OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT FOR ENTREPRENEURS

    1 Unit - 1 hour lecture
    In this interactive course, students will investigate differences between the entrepreneurial environment and the operations environment. Students will examine the readiness of entrepreneurs for managing operations, the skill sets and management competencies, necessary to produce goods and services effectively and efficiently. Topics examined will include, business location, facility design, supply chain management, measures of operational excellence, use of technology, and areas of potential cost savings. NR
  
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    ENTR 241 THE SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS PLAN

    2 Units - 2 hours lecture
    This course provides a systematic process for developing a business plan. The instructor and a network of like-minded students will help those thinking about starting a business to establish a clear roadmap for clarifying a vision for the business and the strategic, tactical, and operational plans needed to move ideas to action. Students further along in the planning and research process will work through the major components of writing a business plan and emerge with a completed draft of a business plan. NR
  
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    ENTR 242 PERSUASIVE PRESENTATIONS

    2 Units - 2 hours lecture
    This course provides students with the opportunity to collaborate and use business plans as the foundation for crafting the story of their business that will engage others to be a part of that story. Entrepreneurs will have the opportunity to create powerful sales tools using technology to create presentations using videos, animation, visuals, and simulations. NR

Environmental Science

  
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    ENV 1 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This introductory course emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach to environmental studies. It includes topics in biology, ecology, chemistry, geology, economics, health, and politics. Emphasis is on current environmental problems, their impacts, and solutions. NR
  
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    ENV 6 ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: WR 1  and MATH 253 
    This introductory environmental and resource economics course focuses on resource, agricultural, and environmental issues and related policy analysis. The course applies microeconomic principles, models and analytical tools to problems of natural resource use and environmental quality caused by human populations. Students examine and evaluate policies to remedy the market failure of inefficient resource use and environmental degradation, both nationally and internationally. ENV 6 is also listed as ECON 6; credit will be given in either area, not both. NR

Ethnic Studies

  
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    ETHN 10 INTRODUCTION TO ETHNIC STUDIES

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: WR 201  , WR 399   or ESL 90  
    Ethnic Studies introduces students to a historical and contemporary survey of ethnic groups and ethnic group relations in the United States among Anglos, Native Americans, Native Pacific Islanders, Asian Americans, Black and African Americans, and Latinx/Chicanx. Students will be introduced to the major concepts and issues in the study of race and ethnicity in the United States and a general overview of topics to be covered in more specialized Ethnic Studies classes. NR
  
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    ETHN 20 INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: WR 201  , WR 399   or ESL 90  
    ETHN 20 is a critical study of the Asian American experience. Students will read scholarly, literary, and visual texts in order to understand how the interdisciplinary field of Asian American Studies confronts issues of Asian American immigration, racialization, exclusion, social and political activism, assimilation, community-building, and transnationalism. It explores questions of gender and sexuality, race and class, war and imperialism, and culture and memory, and the forces that have shaped the experience of Asian Americans. It will also focus on how Asian Americans negotiate and often resist such forces through political and creative means of expression. NR

French

  
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    FR 1 BEGINNING FRENCH I

    5 Units - 5 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course is designed to develop the fundamentals of communicating in French, including basic conversation, listening comprehension and reading. The emphasis is on speaking and comprehending native spoken French. The course introduces basic writing skills and also presents general aspects of French and Francophone life and culture. FR 1 is equivalent to two years of high school French. Credit may be earned in either FR 1 or 1H, but not both. NR
  
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    FR 1H BEGINNING FRENCH I HONORS

    5 Units - 5 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This honors course is designed to develop the fundamentals of communicating in French, including basic conversation, listening comprehension and reading. The emphasis is on speaking and comprehending native spoken French. The course introduces basic writing skills and also presents general aspects of French and Francophone life and culture. This honors course will be enriched through limited class size, more extensive development of speaking, listening and comprehension skills, more extensive exposure to French and Francophone culture and additional assignments beyond the regular FR 1. Students will be assigned expanded reading and a research project that requires critical thinking. FR 1H is equivalent to two years of high school French. Credit may be earned in either FR 1 or 1H, but not both. NR
  
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    FR 2 BEGINNING FRENCH II

    5 Units - 5 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Prerequisite: FR 1  or two years of high school French
    This course continues the development of the fundamental skills acquired in French 1, with increased emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The course introduces students to elements of French and Francophone life and culture. NR
  
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    FR 3 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH

    5 Units - 5 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Prerequisite: FR 2  or three years of high school French
    This course is designed to build upon the fundamental language abilities acquired in FR 1 and 2. Emphasis is on developing more advanced skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students are further introduced to cultural topics related to France and other French-speaking countries. NR
  
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    FR 4 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH

    5 Units - 5 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Prerequisite: FR 3  or four years of high school French
    This course concentrates on developing an intermediate level of fluency, strengthening the skills needed to read, write, and communicate in French. Emphasis is placed on French literature and film and on writing analytical compositions based on readings and films. There is further instruction in French history and culture. NR
  
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    FR 10 INTERMEDIATE CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Prerequisite: FR 2  or three years of high school French
    This course is designed to develop fluency in French, with an emphasis on informal expression. Conversations are centered on topics including current events, politics, cinema, cuisine, art, literature, theatre, and other aspects of French and Francophone culture. NR
  
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    FR 11 ADVANCED CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Prerequisite: FR 3  or FR 10 
    This course is designed to increase the student’s ability to comprehend native spoken French and increase oral fluency. Reading, watching films and oral and written responses enable the student to acquire new vocabulary and structures and examine various aspects of French and Francophone cultures. Field trips may be required. NR
  
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    FR 180 FRENCH LANGUAGE CONFERENCE

    0.5 Unit - 1.5 hours learning center
    Transfers: CSU
    Corequisite: FR 1 FR 1H FR 2 FR 3 FR 4 FR 10 FR 11 
    This open-entry/open-exit, pass/no-pass course offers conference instruction with French language instructors for students enrolled in specified corequisite courses. The course focus is on exercises and assignments to improve students’ speaking, listening, reading, writing, and grammar skills in native French. Students must complete at least 24 hours in the Languages Center during the semester and participate in no fewer than four conferences in order to receive credit. R-E-3

Gender Studies

  
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    GS 10 INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN, GENDER AND SEXUALITY STUDIES

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course is an interdisciplinary course that introduces gendered identities as a category of cultural analysis. This course will offer a survey of theoretical concepts of gender and its intersection with various categories of difference, including sexuality, race, ethnicity, nationality, class, age and ability. The main focus of the course will examine gender within the context of the United States. Students will study the social construction of gender with particular emphasis on social and political activism and resistance and the ways in which social movements have led to societal transformations in both history and contemporary society. C-ID: SJS 120 NR
  
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    GS 20 GENDER AND CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course explores the construction of gender in contemporary culture, media, and social institutions. Students will examine gender in literature, art, music, film, and new media. Additionally, students will study gender in work, family, religion, sports, and social advocacy. Special attention will be paid to issues of intersectionality in contemporary life in terms of race, sexuality, class, age, and ability. NR

Geography

  
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    GEOG 1 PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Physical Geography is the systematic study of the dynamic physical environment of the earth as the human home. Topics include the sun/earth relationship and energy balance, geospatial techniques, the character of the atmosphere, weather, climate, vegetation, the composition of the earth, plate tectonics, landform development and reduction, water, and the modification and pollution of the earth by humans. C-ID: GEOG 110 . NR
  
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    GEOG 1L PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY LABORATORY

    1 Unit - 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Prerequisite: Prior completion of or concurrent enrollment in GEOG 1  
    Laboratory exercises and experiments designed to explore and understand the primary areas of physical geography. Stresses the scientific method in interpreting Earth-sun relations; time; Earth representation through globes, topographic maps and remote sensing; meteorological tools, models and weather prognostication; climate; natural vegetation; geomorphologic models and processes, and landform interpretation. C-ID: GEOG 111. NR
  
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    GEOG 2 CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course explores the kaleidoscope of human activity which takes place on, and interrelates with, the surface of the earth. Geography, a holistic science, investigates such topics as population growth; economic development; human migration; the variety of agriculture; political organization; cultural and ethnic conflict; the origin and diffusion of language; world religions and their distribution; the history, growth and patterns of settlement; the rise of industrialism; and the result of human activity on the land, water, and atmosphere of the earth. C-ID: GEOG 120. NR
  
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    GEOG 3 WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    World Regional Geography provides a systematic study of the major geographic regions of the world. Specific countries within various regions are investigated in terms of their physiographic features, climatic conditions, natural resources, cultural heritage, population characteristics, agricultural practices, transportation systems, economic development, and current geographic issues. Credit may be earned in either GEOG 3 or GEOG 3H , but not both. C-ID: GEOG 125. NR
  
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    GEOG 3H WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY HONORS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: WR 1  
    World Regional Geography Honors provides a systematic study of the major geographic regions of the world. Specific countries within various regions are investigated in terms of their physiographic features, climatic conditions, natural resources, cultural heritage, population characteristics, agricultural practices, transportation systems, economic development, and current geographic issues. This honors course will be enriched with limited class size, small group discussions, advanced academic readings, geographic analysis of spatial data, and a capstone research project. Credit may be earned in either GEOG 3  or 3H, but not both. C-ID: GEOG 125. NR
  
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    GEOG 10 INTRODUCTION TO WEATHER AND CLIMATE

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: WR 201  
    This course is an introduction to Earth’s atmosphere and processes. The course investigates local and global surface weather phenomena, the use of instruments to interpret them, and the classification and distribution of world climates. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships between weather and climate. Topics include atmospheric structure and composition, solar radiation, energy budget, temperature, seasonal changes, atmospheric moisture, clouds and fog, precipitation, circulation systems, air masses and fronts, weather forecasting, climate and climate change. A field trip may be required. Credit may be earned ineither GEOG 10 or GEOG 10H , but not both. C-ID: GEOG 130. NR
  
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    GEOG 10H INTRODUCTION TO WEATHER AND CLIMATE HONORS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: WR 201  
    This honors course is an introduction to Earth’s atmosphere and processes. The course investigates local and global surface weather phenomena, the use of instruments to interpret them, and the classification and distribution of world climates. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships between weather and climate. Topics include atmospheric structure and composition, solar radiation, energy budget, temperature, seasonal changes, atmospheric moisture, clouds and fog, precipitation, circulation systems, air masses and fronts, weather forecasting, climate and climate change. This honors course will be enriched with limited class size, advanced academic readings, analysis of meteorological data, and a capstone research project. A field trip may be required. Credit may be earned in either GEOG 10  or GEOG 10H, but not both. C-ID: GEOG 130. NR
  
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    GEOG 12 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL MAPPING

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course provides an overview of the tools and techniques of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course explores the mapping and spatial analysis capabilities of desktop GIS software (e.g., ArcView, ArcGIS, MapInfo); the management, manipulation and analysis of data; cartographic design and presentation; raster and vector data structures; georeferencing and Global Positioning Systems (GPS); and basic GIS programming. The course discusses how GIS can be applied to various disciplines, including geography, geology, biology, marketing, business and regional planning. C-ID: GEOG 155. NR
  
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    GEOG 15 FIELD GEOGRAPHY OF CITIES AND NATURE

    1 unit - 0.5 hours lecture 1.5 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU. UC
    This lecture and laboratory course introduces students to learning physical and cultural geography in the field. Students observe and analyze patterns in weather and climate, vegetation, natural landscapes and landforms, settlement patterns, land use patterns, and historical cultural geography. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships between humans and their environment. Thematic emphasis will vary depending on location. NR
  
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    GEOG 20 GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: WR 1  
    This course analyzes society-nature relationships and global environmental problems from a geographical perspective. The focus is on the spatial dimensions of global environmental crises as they relate to social, political, and economic issues. Topics examine the historical evolution of environmental issues including population growth, diseases, agriculture and pesticides, climate change, resource extraction and management, energy, endangered species and appropriate development. NR
  
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    GEOG 38 CALIFORNIA GEOGRAPHY

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course provides a broad overview of the state of California in terms of its physical landscape and cultural environment. The state is divided into specific geographic regions; and those regions are analyzed in terms of their physiography, climate, vegetation, water resources, human history, agriculture, mineral resources, manufacturing, transportation, economic development, urbanization, and geographic problems. Students learn to interpret and construct basic maps, the foundation for spatial analysis. Attendance at field trips may be required. C-ID: GEOG 140. NR
  
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    GEOG 102 GEOGRAPHY FIELD STUDIES: WESTERN UNITED STATES

    2 Units - 1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Limitation: Students must be able to hike cross-country on narrow trails and camp (tents, sleeping bags, cooking, limited showers).
    This lecture and laboratory field course studies the cultural and physical geography in the western United States. Students observe and analyze the effects of weather and climate on natural vegetation; use topographical maps to interpret land use and terrain; explore economic and political systems of the region; and evaluate the interrelationships between the physical and cultural environment. Thematic emphasis will vary depending on location. A required course fee must be paid at or prior to the orientation session. C-ID: GEOG 160. NR

Geology

  
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    GEOL 1 PHYSICAL GEOLOGY

    4 Units - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course introduces the principles of geology and the methods of studying the Earth. Consideration is given to the materials of the Earth’s crust, earthquakes, plate tectonics, the processes of mountain building and volcanism, sculpturing of the Earth’s surface, evaluation of natural resources, the implications of geology to society, and aspects of the environment in which our lives are spent. Laboratory exercises include the identification of common rocks and minerals; reading and using topographic maps, aerial photographs, and geologic maps; and constructing topographic profiles and cross-sections to interpret the Earth’s surface. Field trips may be required. C-ID: GEOL 101. NR
  
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    GEOL 2 HISTORICAL GEOLOGY

    4 Units - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Prerequisite: ERTH 20 , GEOL 1  or GEOL 23 
    This course is an in depth study of the physical and biological aspects of the evolution of the earth; with emphasis on the origin and evolution of life reflectred in the rock record. The history and origin of the earth, continents, oceans and atmosphere are also explored. Methods and concepts utilized in deciphering the geologic record will be emphasized in both lecture and lab. Field trips may be required. C-ID: GEOL 111. NR
  
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    GEOL 3 GEOLOGY OF CALIFORNIA

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course is a study of the geologic development of California, including an exploration of plate tectonic and landform processes responsible for shaping the environment. This course examines processes related to earthquakes, faulting, volcanic activity and geologic time, as well as energy resources significant to California. Field trips may be required. C-ID GEOL 200. C-ID: GEOL 200. NR
  
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    GEOL 22 EARTH HISTORY

    4 Units - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: WR 201 WR 399 , or ESL 90  
    This general education lecture and laboratory science course is a study of the evolution of life on Earth, including the environments where life forms are found in the fossil record. Study includes the origin and formation of rock-forming minerals and the three types of rocks found on Earth. Development of the continents, oceans and atmosphere including ideas related to the origin and evolution of life will be introduced. Field trips may be required to fulfill the objectives of this course. Recommended for non-geology majors. NR
  
  •  

    GEOL 23 NATURAL DISASTERS

    4 Units - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course discusses the interaction of man and the geologic environment with particular reference to natural disasters that include earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, wildfires, and climate change. Students learn the principles of sound planning for human use of the planet Earth. Field trips may be required. NR
  
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    GEOL 60 GEOLOGY FIELD STUDIES: NATIONAL PARKS AND MONUMENTS

    1 Unit - 0.5 hour lecture, 1.5 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Limitation: Students must be able to hike and camp (tents, sleeping bags, cooking, limited showers).
    This field study course introduces students to the origin, geology, and natural history of National Parks and Monuments of the western United States. Thematic emphasis, course content, and national parks to be visited will vary. Students in the physical and life sciences are encouraged to enroll. Students are limited to taking four field study courses in geological sciences (GEOL 165, 169, 170, 181, or 186) for a maximum of 4 units. GEOL 60 was formerly offered as GEOL 170. NR
  
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    GEOL 65 GEOLOGY FIELD STUDIES: YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK

    1 Unit - 0.5 hour lecture, 1.5 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Limitation: Students must be able to hike and camp (tents, sleeping bags, cooking, limited showers).
    This field study course introduces students to the geology of the Sierra Nevada Mountains with an emphasis on the geologic origin and evolution of Yosemite National Park, California. Introductory lectures complement direct field observations, field data collection, analysis and interpretation. The course is taught in the field. It is intended for both science majors and non-majors. Students in geology, earth science, marine science, biology and geography are encouraged to enroll. Students are limited to taking four field study courses in geological sciences (GEOL 165, 169, 170, 181, or 186) for a maximum of 4 units. GEOL 65 was formerly offered as GEOL 165. NR
  
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    GEOL 66 GEOLOGY FIELD STUDIES: GEOLOGY OF CALIFORNIA

    1 Unit - 0.5 hour lecture, 1.5 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Limitation: Students must be able to hike, camp (tents, sleeping bags, cooking, limited showers) and live in a group environment.
    This lecture and laboratory field course studies the origin, tectonic development, and present geology of California. Thematic emphasis will vary each time the course is offered depending on destination. Introductory lectures complement direct field observation, field data collection, analysis and interpretation. The course is taught in the field. It is intended for both science majors and non-majors. Students in geology, earth science, marine science, biology and geography courses are encouraged to enroll. Students are limited to taking four field study courses in geological sciences (GEOL 165, 169, 170, 181, or 186)for a maximum of 4 units. GEOL 66 was formerly offered as GEOL 186. NR
  
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    GEOL 167 COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE: GEOLOGY

    1 Unit - 1 hour lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Prerequisite: Student must have taken or must be currently taking a college-level course in the natural sciences.
    Limitation: Application must be approved by CWE coordinator.
    This course provides students an opportunity for supervised work experience. Students extend their classroom-based occupational learning by working at a job related to their major and to their occupational goal. Student, instructor, and employer will cooperatively develop a minimum of three learning objectives. One unit of credit will be awarded for each 75 hours of paid or 60 hours of volunteer employment for successful completion of learning objectives, and for attendance at scheduled seminar sessions. A maximum of four units may be applied toward major requirements or a certificate. NR
  
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    GEOL 167 COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE: GEOLOGY

    2 Units - 2 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Prerequisite: Student must have taken or must be currently taking a college-level course in the natural sciences.
    Limitation: Application must be approved by CWE coordinator.
    This course provides students an opportunity for supervised work experience. Students extend their classroom-based occupational learning by working at a job related to their major and to their occupational goal. Student, instructor, and employer will cooperatively develop a minimum of three learning objectives. One unit of credit will be awarded for each 75 hours of paid or 60 hours of volunteer employment for successful completion of learning objectives, and for attendance at scheduled seminar sessions. A maximum of four units may be applied toward major requirements or a certificate. NR
  
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    GEOL 167 COOPERATIVE WORK EXPERIENCE: GEOLOGY

    3 Units - 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Prerequisite: Student must have taken or must be currently taking a college-level course in the natural sciences.
    Limitation: Application must be approved by CWE coordinator.
    This course provides students an opportunity for supervised work experience. Students extend their classroom-based occupational learning by working at a job related to their major and to their occupational goal. Student, instructor, and employer will cooperatively develop a minimum of three learning objectives. One unit of credit will be awarded for each 75 hours of paid or 60 hours of volunteer employment for successful completion of learning objectives, and for attendance at scheduled seminar sessions. A maximum of four units may be applied toward major requirements or a certificate. NR
  
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    GEOL 169 GEOLOGY FIELD STUDIES-ZION NATIONAL PARK, UTAH

    1 Unit - 0.5 hour lecture, 1.5 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Limitation: Students must be able to hike and camp (tents, sleeping bags, cooking, limited showers).
    This field study course introduces students to the geology of the Colorado Plateau region with emphasis on the origin and evolution of Zion National Park, Utah. Introductory lectures complement direct field observations, field data collection, analysis and interpretation. The course is taught in the field. It is intended for both science majors and non-majors. Students in geology, earth science, marine science, biology and geography are encouraged to enroll. Students are limited to taking four field study courses in geological sciences (GEOL 165, 169, 170, 181, or 186) for a maximum of 4 units. NR
  
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    GEOL 181 GEOLOGY FIELD STUDIES: COASTAL AND OFFSHORE GEOLOGY

    1 Unit - 0.5 hour lecture, 1.5 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    Limitation: Students must be able to hike and camp (tents, sleeping bags, cooking, limited showers).
    Recommended Preparation: Introductory college-level geology and/or marine science courses.
    This field study course introduces students to the origin, evolution, and geology of coastal and offshore field areas in the western United States. Introductory lectures complement direct field observations, data collection, analysis and interpretation. Thematic emphasis and course content will vary depending on destination. The course is taught entirely in the field. It is intended for both science majors and non-majors. Students in geology, earth science, marine science, biology, and geography are encouraged to enroll. Students are limited to taking four field study courses in geological sciences (GEOL 165, 169, 170, 181, or 186) for a maximum of 4 units. NR

Global Studies

  
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    GLBL 1 INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL STUDIES

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: WR 201 , WR 399 , ESL 90  
    This course offers students an introduction to the interdisciplinary program of global studies. As a foundational course, this course focuses on a series of issues and problems associated with globalization. The course examines the nature and history of globalization, and analyzes economic, political, cultural and ecological dimensions of globalization. For each dimension, focus is on the extent of international conflict and cooperation, and effects of growing interdependence. C-ID: GLST 101 NR
  
  •  

    GLBL 2 INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL ISSUES

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: WR 201 , WR 399  or ESL 90  
    This course introduces students to the social, political, and economic problems that transcend international boundaries in a globalized world. Students will become familiar with the roles and perspectives of individuals, organizations and governments toward global problems and the complex linkages and interdependencies that lead to conflict and cooperation in the international system. C-ID: GLST 102 NR

Health

  
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    HLTH 1 HEALTH EDUCATION

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course focuses on the exploration of major health issues and behaviors in the various dimensions of health. Emphasis is place on individual responsibility for personal health and the promotion of informed, positive health behaviors. Topics include nutrition, exercise, weight control, mental health, stress management, violence, substance abuse, reproductive health, disease prevention, aging, healthcare, and environmental hazards and safety NR
  
  •  

    HLTH 2 FIRST AID: RESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This lifesaving skill-training course provides students with the practical resources necessary to respond effectively in emergency situations. The course covers accident and injury prevention, emergency medical care, emergency childbirth, first aid for common injuries and for people with special needs, and responding to delayed help (e.g., wilderness) situations. Two American Red Cross first aid certificates (Responding to Emergencies and Community CPR) and an AED (Automatic External Defibrillator) certification will be granted upon successful completion of all course requirements. C-ID: KIN 101. NR
  
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    HLTH 3 WOMEN’S HEALTH ISSUES

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course investigates a variety of topics that concern women’s health. These include the effect of lifestyle on health; the role of exercise and nutrition in promoting wellness; risk factors for cardiovascular disease, chronic diseases, and cancer; social influences and work trends that affect women; abusive behaviors, sexual harassment, and substance abuse; sexual and reproductive health; and the aging process. Students analyze theoretical and practical information to make healthy lifestyle choices. NR
  
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    HLTH 5 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HEALTH

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course provides an introduction to the discipline of public health. Students will gain an understanding of the basic concepts and terminologies of public health, and the history and accomplishments of public health officials and agencies. An overview of the functions of various public health professions and institutions, and an in-depth examination of the core public health disciplines is covered. Topics include the epidemiology of infectious and chronic disease; prevention and control of diseases in the community including the analysis of the social determinants of health and strategies for eliminating disease, illness and health disparities among various populations; community organizing and health promotion programming; environmental health and safety; global health; and healthcare policy and management. C-ID: PHS 101 NR
  
  •  

    HLTH 6 HEALTH AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course provides an introduction to the health inequities in the United States that stem from unequal living conditions. Students will explore how education, socioeconomic status, racism and gender shape health epidemics and policy development. Fundamental theories to advocate for health and social justice will be presented. C-ID: PHS 102 NR
  
  •  

    HLTH 7 GLOBAL HEALTH

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course explores the primary determinants of global health, inequalities in healthstatus among nations, and current challenges, controversies and public policy priorities. NR
  
  •  

    HLTH 131 SIMPLE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESSFUL WEIGHT MANAGEMENT

    1.5 Units - 1 hour lecture, 1.5 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU
    This course is designed to help students manage their weight. The emphasis is on combining good nutrition and regular exercise to meet body weight goals. This comprehensive class includes classroom teaching time as well as workouts at the IVC Fitness Center. Students learn how to choose healthy, balanced meals at home or away; read packaged food labels; avoid the “diet failure mentality”; use exercise equipment properly; and design a safe, individualized exercise program. NR

History

  
  •  

    HIST 1 THE HISTORY OF WORLD CIVILIZATIONS TO 1500

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: WR 201 WR 399 , or ESL 90  
    This course examines the origins, major themes, and principal developments of world civilizations from prehistory to the 16th century. Special emphasis is given to the emergence of complex societies and the rise and development of civilization in the ancient Near East, classical Mediterranean world, Asia, the later Mediterranean world, Africa, Oceania, and the Americas. Central themes include urbanization and imperial impulses; individual-communal dynamic; emergence of major religious/philosophical traditions; elaboration of value systems and worldviews; science and the diffusion of technologies; human and natural environment interactions; and the historically varied formulations of identity. Credit may be earned in either HIST 1 or 1H, but not both. C-ID: HIST 150. NR
  
  •  

    HIST 1H THE HISTORY OF WORLD CIVILIZATIONS TO 1500 HONORS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: WR 201 WR 399 , or ESL 90  
    This course examines the origins, major themes, and principal developments of world civilizations from prehistory to the 16th century. Emphasis is given to the emergence of complex societies and the rise and development of civilization in the ancient Near East, classical Mediterranean world, Asia, the later Mediterranean world, Africa, Oceania, and the Americas. Central themes include urbanization and imperial impulses; individual-communal dynamic; emergence of major religious/philosophical traditions; elaboration of value systems and worldviews; science and the diffusion of technologies; human and natural environments interactions; historically varied formulations of identity. This course will have a limited class size, and more extensive writing assignments. Credit may be earned in either HIST 1 or 1H, but not both. C-ID: HIST 150. NR
  
  •  

    HIST 2 THE HISTORY OF WORLD CIVILIZATIONS SINCE 1500

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course examines the origins, major themes, and principle developments of world civilizations since the 16th century. Special emphasis is given to interactions among various civilizations in Europe, Asia, Africa, Oceania, and the Americas and their mutual interdependence in the shaping of the modern world. Particular attention will be paid to the analysis of themes like imperialism, colonialism, industrialization, trade, modernization, urbanization and the rise of the nation-state. C-ID: HIST 160. NR
  
  •  

    HIST 10 WESTERN CIVILIZATION: BEGINNINGS TO THE REFORMATION

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: WR 201 WR 399 , or ESL 90  or eligibility for WR 1  
    This course is a survey of the scope, definition and culture of the West in a global context from the rise of Paleolithic and Neolithic societies in Eurasia to the Protestant Reformation in Europe. Emphasis will be on the major developments in the cultural, political, and social history of the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, Rome, and Europe from Late Antiquity through the Reformation. C-ID: HIST 170. NR
  
  •  

    HIST 11 THE WEST AND THE WORLD SINCE THE RENAISSANCE

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    The course considers the principal developments of Western civilization within a global context. Students explore the impact of Western themes, institutions, and ideas upon non-Western cultures, as well as the corresponding influence of non-Western cultures upon the “Western heritage.” Special emphasis will be given to the emergence of such themes as the nation-state, rationalism and empiricism, industrialization, liberalism, nationalism, socialism, modern imperialism, post-war realignments, and geopolitics. The course traces the development of European culture from the 16th century to the present, and throughout this entire period, its relations and exchanges with non-Western cultures, including China, Japan, Africa, and the Americas. C-ID: HIST 180. NR
  
  •  

    HIST 20 AMERICAN HISTORY THROUGH THE CIVIL WAR

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course is a study of the history of the United States from its colonial origins through the Reconstruction period. The survey will focus on the major themes, ideas, attitudes, institutions, and elements that are part of the American national development through the mid-19th century. Special emphasis is given to the European antecedents; the forging of an American culture within the colonial context; the political, social, and economic development within the framework of a national experience and identity; and the problems of cultural expansion and divergent growth reflected in the Civil War. C-ID: HIST 130. NR
  
  •  

    HIST 21 AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE THE CIVIL WAR

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    History 21 is a study of the history of the United States from the Civil War to the present. The survey will focus on the major themes, ideas, attitudes, institutions, and elements that are part of the American national development from the mid-19th century to the present. Special emphasis will be given to national recovery and the victory of industrialization after the war, domestic reformism from the Populists and the Progressives to the New Deal, international relations from overseas expansion to involvement in world wars, and shifting foreign and domestic patterns from World War II to the present. C-ID: HIST 140. NR
  
  •  

    HIST 24 AMERICA AFTER THE BOMB: 1945 TO THE PRESENT

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    History 24 is a study of the history of the United States from the end of the Second World War to the present. It focuses on the principal political, social, economic, and cultural challenges and achievements in American life since 1945 as reflected in domestic and foreign developments. Special emphasis is given to the use of the atomic bomb at the end of World War II, the Cold War at home and abroad, prosperity and conformity in the 50’s, social ferment in the 60’s, the Civil Rights movement, the New Left and counterculture, black militancy, domestic upheaval in the 70’s, mass dissent and the Vietnam War, political cynicism and Watergate, feminism, ethnic consciousness, realignment in the 80’s, detente and the arms race, and geopolitics and the Third World. NR
  
  •  

    HIST 25 HISTORY OF CALIFORNIA

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Students study and analyze California history from its pre-colonial origins through the present. Students survey the contributions of peoples of diverse cultures in the development of California and the ways in which California has and continues to influence the nation and the world. NR
  
  •  

    HIST 30 HISTORY OF ETHNICITY AND CULTURE IN THE UNITED STATES

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    A general survey of selected ethnic groups in American history, including Native Americans, African Americans, European Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinos, as well as the major impacts of immigration from the pre-contact period through the present. NR
  
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    HIST 33 THE HISTORY OF THE MEXICAN AMERICAN PEOPLE

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course examines the principal developments in Chicano history from its Mesoamerican origins to the present. Students explore the indigenous and European influences which have shaped the culture, character, and history of Mexican Americans, and the manner in which the cultural patterns have been retained or redefined by life in the U.S. NR
  
  •  

    HIST 40 THE HISTORY OF EAST ASIA BEFORE 1800

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course provides an overview of the pre-modern histories of China, Japan and Korea, and of their institutional and cultural interaction. Topics include the origins of civil statecraft in China and its impact on Korean and Japan; the development of a distinctive warrior class in Japan; the elaboration of court cultures in the traditional era. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of the conflicting themes of cultural unity and cultural uniqueness in East Asian civilization, and on the way in which cultural codes from China were transformed when imported to Japan and Korea. NR
  
  •  

    HIST 41 THE HISTORY OF EAST ASIA SINCE 1800

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course examines the major themes in the development of Chinese, Korean, and Japanese societies from the late 18th century to the present. Topics include the growth of the Confucian state in China; the role of 19th century crises and the Communist revolution in transforming the state’s goals and capacities; the fragmentation and reorientation of the Chinese elite; peasant rebellion and the revolution of 1949; protest and resistance to traditional and modern regimes; the influence of Western contact on the restructuring of Japan; industrialization; political modernization and imperialism in Japan; the recovery of post-war Japan; and economic dominance in the late 20th century. HIST 41 is also listed as PS 41 ; credit given in either area, not both. NR
  
  •  

    HIST 51 WOMEN IN AMERICAN HISTORY

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course surveys the history of women in the United States from the pre-contact period to the present, addressing significant events, processes, individuals, and movements that have contributed to the nation’s development and women’s changing roles. The course investigates the ways in which geographic location, class, ethnicity, race, sexual orientation, urbanization, technology, labor, and notions of family have affected the political, social, economic, intellectual, and sexual lives of American women. Feminisms and the politics of gender are recurrent themes in this historical and cultural analysis. Credit may be earned in HIST 51 and 51H, but not both. NR
  
  •  

    HIST 51H WOMEN IN AMERICAN HISTORY HONORS

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course surveys the history of women in the United States from the pre-contact period to the present, addressing significant events, processes, individuals, and movements that have contributed to the nation’s development and women’s changing roles. The course investigates the ways in which geographic location, class, ethnicity, race, sexual orientation, urbanization, technology, labor, and notions of family have affected the political, social, economic, intellectual, and sexual lives of American women. Feminisms and the politics of gender are recurrent themes in this historical and cultural analysis. The honors course is enriched through seminar style classrooms, additional writing assignments, independent research, and attention to historiography. Credit may be earned in either HIST 51  or 51H, but not both. NR

Human Development

  
  •  

    HD 4 INFANT AND TODDLER DEVELOPMENT

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    A study of infants and toddlers from preconception to age three including physical, cognitive, language, social, and emotional growth and development. Applies theoretical frameworks to interpret behavior and interactions between heredity and environment. Emphasizes the role of family and relationships in development. C-ID: CDEV 100. NR
  
  •  

    HD 7 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY: CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: PSYC 1  
    This course presents a study of the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial processes of human development from conception through adolescence. It introduces the theories, research, and applications that constitute the field of child development both typical and atypical, examining both traditional approaches and recent innovations. Topics address the physical, motor, perceptual, cognitive, emotional, and social areas of development. The course discusses issues related to intellectual functioning, learning, personality, social roles and relationships, and adjustment. It meets Title 22 Licensing requirements and California Child Development Permit Requirements. HD 7 is also listed as PSYC 7; credit will be given in either area, not both. C-ID: CDEV 100. NR
  
  •  

    HD 10 INTRODUCTION TO ELEMENTARY TEACHING

    3 Units - 2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: WR 1  
    This course introduces students to the concepts and issues related to teaching diverse learners in today’s contemporary schools, Kindergarten through grade 12 (K-12). Topics include teaching as a profession and career, historical and philosophical foundations of the American education system, contemporary educational issues, California’s content standards and frameworks, and teacher performance standards. In addition to class time, the course requires a minimum of 45 hours of structured fieldwork in public school classrooms that represent California’s diverse student population, and includes cooperation with at least one carefully selected and campus-approved certificated classroom teacher. C-ID: EDUC 200. NR
  
  •  

    HD 15 SOCIALIZATION OF THE CHILD - CHILD, FAMILY, COMMUNITY

    3 Units - 3 hours lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    Recommended Preparation: PSYC 1  or PSYC 1H SOC 1  or SOC 1H  
    This course examines the influence of major socializing agents-family, school, peers, media, and community-on the developing child. The course addresses historical, cultural, and socioeconomic factors that affect a child’s socialization, as well as issues confronting children with specialized needs and resources available for interventions. Emphasis is placed on the importance of respectful, reciprocal relationships that support and empower families. This course is of particular interest to students preparing for a career working with children. It also meets Title 22 licensing requirements for childcare providers. HD 15 is also listed as SOC 15; credit will be given in either area, not both. C-ID: CDEV 110. NR
  
  •  

    HD 65 INTRODUCTION TO SCHOOL-AGE CHILD DEVELOPMENT

    1 Unit - 1 hour lecture
    Transfers: CSU, UC
    This course examines the factors contributing to optimal development in the biosocial, cognitive, and psychosocial domains during middle childhood between 6 and 12 years of age. Students are introduced to both grand and emergent theories and will apply practical applications to an understanding children in middle childhood. The course is of particular interest to students preparing for a career in school-age childcare settings as well as to parents, grandparents or guardians. This course meets Title 22 licensing requirements for school-age childcare providers. NR
 

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